HomeUnited StatesSusan Collins and Joe Manchin say Kavanaugh and Gorsuch MISLED them

Susan Collins and Joe Manchin say Kavanaugh and Gorsuch MISLED them

US Senators Joe Manchin and Susan Collins have criticized Supreme Court Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch for their votes on Friday to overthrow Roe V. Wade.

Senators had voted to confirm Donald Trump-appointed judges despite fears they would break the landmark abortion ruling, with senators saying at the time they trusted Kavanaugh and Gorsuch to uphold the law.

Now Collins, a Republican, and Manchin, a Democrat, accuse judges of misleading them when they criticized the court’s 6-3 ruling ending women’s federal abortion rights.

“This decision contradicts what Justices Gorsuch and Kavanaugh said in their testimony and in their meetings with me, where they both insisted on the importance of upholding longstanding precedents that the country has relied on ‘ Collins said in a statement.

Manchin echoed the outrage, saying: “I trusted Justices Gorsuch and Justices Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade is a settled precedent and I am alarmed that they have chosen to reject the stability that the ruling has created for two generations of Americans.’

US Senator Joe Manchin

U.S. Senators Susan Collins (left) and Joe Manchin (right) criticized Supreme Court Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch for their votes to overthrow Roe V. Wade, after previously claiming during their confirmation hearings, it is an established law

Judge Brett Kavanaugh

Judge Neil Gorsuch

Kavanaugh (left) and Neil Gorsuch (right) were among six conservative justices who voted Friday to end Americans’ federal abortion rights

During his 2018 confirmation hearings, many believed Kavanaugh would oppose Roe V. Wade, but the judiciary said he stood behind the decision, which he repeated to Collins in a one-on-one interview about his stances and beliefs (pictured).

During his 2018 confirmation hearings, many believed Kavanaugh would oppose Roe V. Wade, but the judiciary said he stood behind the decision, which he repeated to Collins in a one-on-one interview about his stances and beliefs (pictured).

The fate of Roe V. Wade had long occupied the nation when Trump appointed Gorsuch in 2017 and Kavanaugh a year later.

Liberals feared that the conservative-leaning judges would act to protect Roe v. to overthrow Wade if they had a chance, but both men said in their confirmation hearings that the landmark ruling was established law.

“The 1973 case of Roe v. Wade is a US Supreme Court precedent,” Gorsuch told senators in 2017. “He’s been reconfirmed.

“So a good judge will take it as precedent from the US Supreme Court, which as precedent should be treated like any other.”

Kavanaugh did not publicly respond as to whether he believed Roe v. Wade was “correct law,” but emphasized that it was not only settled, but reinforced by the court’s 1992 Planned Parenthood Casey V., which upheld federal abortion rights.

“So now Casey becomes a precedent for precedents,” Kavanaugh said in 2018. “It’s not like it’s just an ordinary case that’s been decided and never reconsidered, but Casey specifically thought about it and applied Star’s decision factors.” , and decided to affirm it.’

Collins said Kavanaugh repeated what he said to her in a one-on-one interview in 2018.

“We talked about whether he sees Roe as fixed law,” Collins said at the time. ‘He said he agreed with what justice is [John] said Roberts at his nomination hearing, saying it was an established right.

“We had a very good and thorough discussion on this topic and many others.”

Last month, both Collins and Manchin voted to reject legislation that would have codified Roe V. Wade’s protections.

Pictured: Collins confirms to reporters that Kavanaugh told her Roe V. Wade was

Pictured: Collins confirms to reporters that Kavanaugh told her Roe V. Wade was “compliant with the law” after they met during his confirmation hearings

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined the senators in slamming Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, who described the Supreme Court decision as a “slap in the face to women.”

“How about these judges come before the senators and say they respect Stare Decision, the court’s precedent,” Pelosi said in a statement.

“That they respect the right to privacy in the United States Constitution. Did you hear that? Didn’t they tell the truth then?’

The conservative-majority decision has made waves across the country, sparking both protests and celebrations as leaders rushed to implement abortion bans while others sought to expand freedom-of-choice legislation.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also criticized the two justices for

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also criticized the two justices for “lying” to the senators

Abortion was automatically banned in 18 US states once Roe v. Wade was overturned thanks to specially designed “trigger laws” and historic bans that were automatically reinstated after Friday’s ruling.

Thirteen states were preparing trigger laws that would automatically ban terminations if the Roe v. Wade would cancel what was widely expected.

They are: Arkansas; Idaho; Kentucky; Louisiana; Mississippi; Missouri; North Dakota; Oklahoma; South Dakota; Tennessee; Texas; Utah and Wyoming.

Abortion bans in these states now become law within 30 days.

Five other states have now also banned redundancies after historic laws replaced by the 1973 Roe ruling automatically went back into effect.

Among those five are two Democrat-ruled states – Michigan and Wisconsin.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers have both sought to overturn those bans in court. But they remain in place for now, and Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin announced Friday afternoon that layoffs will be suspended while awaiting clarification of the law.

Other states with newly enacted historic bans include Alabama, Arizona, and West Virginia.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has announced that the historic ban will be replaced with a recently passed law banning layoffs after 15 weeks.

But that edict was not enshrined in state law, and pro-lifers could end up fighting Ducey to uphold the historic ban on all abortions, leaving abortion providers uncertain about operating in the meantime.

Eight other states will also enact new anti-abortion laws. Georgia, Iowa and South Carolina all tried to ban abortion after the six-week mark.

These laws have been branded as unconstitutional but will likely be revisited after Roe ends. And Florida, Indiana, Montana, and Nebraska are all working on plans to ban or limit layoffs.

Hours after the announcement of Roe v. Wade announced to Virginia GOP Gov. Glenn Youngkin that he had asked four Republican lawmakers to begin drafting legislation banning abortions at 15 weeks.

But Youngkin’s party faces a very narrow majority in both the House and Senate, and many of his fellow Republicans will likely be undecided about supporting an abortion ban.

And Kansas — which has passed no crackdown on abortion — will hold a referendum in August on whether to ban abortion there.

More than half of all US states have some form of anti-abortion law, which is likely to go into effect now after it was announced on Friday that Roe v Wade was overturned by the US Supreme Court.

THE 26 STATES TO BAN ABORTION NOW AFTER ROE v. WADE WAS FORMALLY REPEALED

Alabama

Arizona

Arkansas

Idaho

Kentucky

Louisiana

Michigan

Mississippi

Missouri

North Dakota

South Dakota

Oklahoma

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Georgia

Iowa

Ohio

South Carolina

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